We've got a couple of real winners right here. First off, don't drink and drive. It's dangerous and we've already had so many people die on Minnesota Roads this year. Side note: We've already topped 200 deaths by July 1, and that's putting us on a record pace for the deadliest year on the roads.

So back to what happened. The Eden Prairie police department shared a story where a police officer arrested and charged both occupants of a vehicle recently. How could that possibly be? You would imagine that only the driver would get charged. Here's how it went down.

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Back in April, Officer Chad Streiff observed a car speeding on Highway 62, and then blew through a red light. He then attempted to pull the car over, and he saw the car slow down and the driver and the passenger quickly switched seats while the car was still moving.

The car then stopped, and both the male and female occupants smelled like booze. They had the classic bloodshot, watery eyes. They both failed the breathalyzer test with the male blowing a .24 and the female blowing a .15. The legal limit is .08. Since they both were witnessed driving the car while intoxicated, they both got DUIs. Consider it a two for one not so happy hour.

To top it all off, this was the 4th DUI the guy had in the last 10 years. That makes it a felony charge and the vehicle was forfeited. Just be smart, and don't drink and drive. Also if you think you're going to trick the cops by doing a quick seat swap you may get more than you both bargained for.

The Minnesota State Patrol is also kicking off a speeding and driving sober campaign for the rest of the month. Make sure you watch your speed and plan a sober driver.

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.

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