Two Minnesota cases: A New Brighton Jane Doe case from 2000 and a Bone Lake Jane Doe Case from 1993 are a part of the DNA Doe Project.

The DNA Doe Project is a non-profit that uses investigative genetic genealogy to identify John and Jane Doe's unidentified remains. They have cutting-edge techniques that help with cases where the DNA was highly degraded or of low quantity.

The Project’s all-volunteer research teams are made up of some of the best investigative genetic genealogists in the industry, that unite for the common goal of reuniting John and Jane Does with their families and communities.

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Let's dive into the two cases from Minnesota that are currently in the pre-funding phase at the DNA Doe Project:

Bone Lake Jane Doe, 1993

In the early summer of 1993, an absolutely horrific discovery was made when the head of a woman was floating near the shore of Bone Lake in New Scandia Township. About 20 miles southwest in St. Paul, a foot was located on the bank of Pig's Eye Lake. The woman was determined to be Caucasian and estimated to be between 30-65 years old.

Due to just the head and foot being discovered, a height could not be determined. She had dark brown spiky hair and brown eyes. Her ears were triple pierced, and she had red toenail polish on two toes.


 

New Brighton Jane Doe, 2000

Back in the fall of 2000, while on a stroll a couple stumbled upon the remains of a mummified nude woman in the swampy area of the park in Ramsey County. The woman was determined to be Caucasian and estimated to be between 25-50 years old.

She was around 5'5" with strawberry blonde hair. There was no clothing on the body, however, there was one white tennis shoe located nearby. The cause of death is also unknown due to the level of decomposition. Investigators do believe that she was unfortunately a victim of a homicide and had possibly been stabbed.


 

If you are looking for a Missing Person, you can visit For Families to learn how to increase the chances that the person you're looking for could be identified. If you are a medical examiner or from a law enforcement agency and want to work with the project on the case, you can check out the For Agencies page.

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